Learn as you game.

Video games have been under fire for many social issues but fresh studies show the opposite where gaming can place a helping hand in educational.

Harnessing the potential gaming has maybe the answer in a growing digital world. With the introduction of gadgets such as oculus rift, many believe it may be time to develop today’s society for tomorrow’s security.

Much research as shown mixed results in a younger audience that have played violent video games but what if children played non-violent games in a controlled and positive environment?

The answer is improved brain function, decision making skills, stress release and many more still being researched. By introducing children to serious games such as heavy rain,  an early start for children could prep them for later life as well as less stress in school and home.

While researching this concept I came across many seeking the some knowledge with amazing results.

According to Personal Technology, Volume  64, the retro video game known as Pac-man was seen as a simple game as it portrayed primitive graphics and simple game play where you eat fruit while avoiding enemies. It was a simple 70’s game but as the level progressed so did the level of intensity and decision making. Quick reflexes and time decision making is key in the accomplishment of the game. In turn, this helped the player gain knowledge of how to maneuver around in harsh places and forced them to use their brain in timing their next move. Many were shown to have better knowledge in remembering things and even had increased reflexes. The level of stress that gamers released was abnormal, even today.

 Minecraft

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people. – See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthash.1lhjAGlv.dpuf

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people. – See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthash.1lhjAGlv.dpuf

 

A perfect example of a game that helps in delevopment of education is a game called Minecraft. Minecraft started out as a small game from an unknown developr for a casual audience. Nearly four years since it’s release, almost 20million registered users have downloaded and play this game. The objective is to simply survive by collecting resources, managibg inventory, creating an enviroemnt and simply to build amazing structuires by putting all these into practice. In short terms, its a neverending bulding game.

Already, some have already taken advantage of this game and have created programs within schools to teach about the environment. A company called MinecraftEdu from the United States is a small group of programmers who have teamed up with Mojang, the developer of Minecraft, to make the game affordable for schools around the world aswell as intergrating aspects to enviromental teaching.

http://minecraftedu.com/page/

In a June 2013 article, Yale University School of Medicine researchers suggest how the future of these technologies is now evolving:

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people.

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthash.1lhjAGlv.dpuf

In a June 2013 article, Yale University School of Medicine researchers suggest how the future of these technologies is now evolving:

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people.

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthash.1lhjAGlv.dpuf

In a June 2013 article, Yale University School of Medicine researchers suggest how the future of these technologies is now evolving:

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people.

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthash.1lhjAGlv.dpuf

In a June 2013 article, Yale University School of Medicine researchers suggest how the future of these technologies is now evolving:

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people.

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthash.1lhjAGlv.dpuf

In a June 2013 article, Yale University School of Medicine researchers suggest how the future of these technologies is now evolving:

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people.

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthas

In a June 2013 article, Yale University School of Medicine researchers suggest how the future of these technologies is now evolving:

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people.

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthash.1lhjAGlv.dpuf

In a June 2013 article, Yale University School of Medicine researchers suggest how the future of these technologies is now evolving:

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people.

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthash.1lhjAGlv.dpuf

In a June 2013 article, Yale University School of Medicine researchers suggest how the future of these technologies is now evolving:

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people.

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthash.1lhjAGlv.dpuf

n a June 2013 article, Yale University School of Medicine researchers suggest how the future of these technologies is now evolving:

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people.

Below is a collection of recent academic scholarship that addresses the use and effectiveness of digital and game-based learning in the classroom and beyond.

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthash.1lhjAGlv.dpuf

n a June 2013 article, Yale University School of Medicine researchers suggest how the future of these technologies is now evolving:

Electronic games are a promising tool for educating people and changing behavior. While the first wave of interactive educational games relied on what some call the “chocolate-covered broccoli” model, where the narrative was interrupted by tedious, poorly constructed tasks that proceeded like homework, the new trend is to integrate learning and fun. One of our primary goals is that more researchers and funding sources will emerge to take on the task of developing and rigorously testing evidence-based electronic games to find the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors among young people.

Below is a collection of recent academic scholarship that addresses the use and effectiveness of digital and game-based learning in the classroom and beyond.

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/outcomes-of-game-based-learning-research-roundup#sthash.1lhjAGlv.dpu

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